For Your Love

Animated For Your Love tab by The Yardbirds on guitar. So easy you'll be playing in minutes.

This vintage 60's song is suitable for beginners. The original song uses a harpsichord for some song parts (like the intro). However, you can play the high chords, as we do, to get a similar effect. In fact, Clapton would play a 12 string to get that harpsichord effect for performing the song live.

90% of the song is just moving through 4 chords. And even nicer, the chords are all barre chords - so the same two chord shapes are used for all 4 chords!

If you don't have a harpsichord, then use the high chords we show at the start of the ActionTab. These are:

E minor
G major
A major
A minor

Notice how the same chord shape is used for each chord. The only difference is whether the chord is major or minor. This will mean you use an extra finger on the fretboard (or not). For example, compare A major and A minor. The difference is just that 1 note!

Now these high chords may be too hard to play on your guitar. Don't even try it on an acoustic (most acoustic guitars aren't designed to be played beyond the 15th fret). Even on an electric it can be impossible for some people to get a good clean barre chord across all 6 strings at those tiny frets. Worry not. There are 2 common solutions to this problem:

1. Just fret and play the top 3 or 4 strings of the barre chord (forget the bass notes and just play the high ones). This will be much easier to do.

2. Just play the whole thing starting at the open position instead (1 octave lower). This is convenient, especially as the next part of the song is played that way anyhow!

E minor
G major
A major
A minor

Notice that these chords are exactly the same as last time - just low down the neck! Remember that a distance of 12 frets is an octave. An octave gives the same chord, just at a higher or lower pitch. For example, here's the high octave A minor from earlier in the intro. And here's the lower octave A minor. Click the links and play the ActionTab to compare those 2 chords. You should be able to hear the similarity of the chords. They are both A minor, but one is lower and one is higher. Octaves always occur 12 frets apart (we deal with this more in the Theory section).

To play the majority of the song, just keep cycling through that 4 chord progression. If you are new to guitar, just start slowly and give your fingers time to form each chord. Don't worry about speed yet. It's more important to get it right and without buzzing notes etc before getting it fast. Once you can get the chords sounding good and clear, then work on getting the timing and pace better.

The hardest part of the song is this little riff played in the middle. It's a typical blues-rock boogie and is palm muted throughout. For most people it's getting the finger stretches between notes that is the hardest part. This part will take practice, but stick at it and you'll get it! If you are having a lot of difficulties, try playing it all out 12 frets higher (use the magic octave trick in reverse this time). That will be easier for you, due to the much shorter fret spacings. Once your fingers can play it up there, play it down at the low octave again. You'll find it much easier to get it then!

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